Top class … Zydeco returns after winning the Wakeful.Atlantic Jewel has pleased vets and remains on track to return to racing in the autumn. The unbeaten mare was favourite for the Cox Plate when a leg injury forced her out of the spring in August. “That was disappointing but we got some good news this week,” part-owner Laurie Macri said. ”The vets were happy with the way her leg has come along and there was enough positives there for us to start to think about her racing again. There is still a long way to go, though.” The vet report said Atlantic Jewel was a 60 per cent chance of racing again. She will continue her rehabilitation at Mark Kavanagh’s property and be checked again in two months.
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DELZANGLES IN FORM

Dunaden’s trainer Mikel Delzangles celebrated Breeders’ Cup success with two-year-old filly Flotilla at Santa Anita on Friday. The French trainer will return to Melbourne for the third time this month as Dunaden defends his Melbourne Cup crown. ”This is great, absolutely great,” he said. ”It was a good preliminary for Australia.” Flotilla settled midfield before bursting through the field as she powered home for a 1?-length victory over Watsdachances. “I was surprised how well she settled here,” he said. ”I was not confident she would win but thought she would run a good race. Hopefully, she will be a Classic filly in Europe next year.”

BAKER VOWS TO RETURN

Murray Baker shrugged off Victoria Derby disappointment with It’s A Dundeel, declaring his intention to come back across the Tasman for the Australian Derby. ”He got a long way back, but we always knew that [he would],” Baker said after It’s A Dundeel ($2.70 favourite) failed to make an impression when seventh behind Fiveandahalfstar. ”The leaders just kept kicking. He’s done a lot in a short time and we’ll take him for a little spell and bring him back for the AJC Derby. He’s only had the six runs, but travelling and that has probably caught up with him a little bit. He made up ground, but he only plugged the last little bit. He had his chance.” Fiveandahalfstar’s win snapped a New Zealand domination of the race. The Kiwis had won the past three editions until Saturday, including the win of Baker’s Lion Tamer in 2010. It’s A Dundeel had chartered almost an unbeaten path to the Victoria Derby until defeat in The Vase at Moonee Valley in his last hitout before the Victoria Derby.

WALLER PAYS FOR MISTAKE

Red Tracer’s trainer Chris Waller was fined $1000 after the mare arrived in the mounting yard without her lead bag. ”We had saddled her and she had walked off then we found the lead bag on the ground,” Waller said. “It must have just fallen down, so we told the stewards and they asked her to reweigh. It was just an honest mistake.”

ZYDECO SHOWS CLASS

Anthony Freedman knows all about potential; he’s seen far too many horses fail to deliver on their promise, and so he was relieved as much as he was pleased when Oaks favourite Zydeco stormed to victory in the Wakeful Stakes. Eye-catching runs in the Edward Manifold Stakes and then the Thousand Guineas when third behind Commanding Jewel had stamped Zydeco as a filly with immense potential, but Freedman wanted proof that the horse was as good as he had hoped. “That’s what I hoped for, I think she’s very good,” he said. ”It didn’t surprise me but you still like to see it [on race day].”

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BEFORE surgeons removed a large part of her stomach to help her lose weight, Vanessa Hall asked her doctor what affect the procedure would have on her body by the time she turned 80.
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His answer, she said, was: ”We don’t know. We don’t know what happens.”

And therein lies the dilemma for the 17,000 people the Australian Bureau of Statistics says undergo the procedure each year – little is known about what effect reducing, removing or bypassing the stomach has on health long term.

But endocrinologists from Sydney’s Garvan Institute have completed the first comprehensive review of the impact of bariatric surgery on bone density and say even the least invasive of the weight-loss procedures may compromise patients’ bone health.

That was a potential repercussion never brought up when Mrs Hall, 30, underwent her gastric-sleeve procedure late last year. She weighed 109 kilograms.

”I didn’t have a bone scan or anything like that,” she said. ”But I do worry I am not getting my recommended daily intake of certain nutrients and I think that’s why they stress the importance of taking a multivitamin after surgery. You do lose a lot of hair in the first three months afterwards, you feel fatigued, and your diet is pretty much clear liquids.”

Now 84 kilograms, Mrs Hall does not regret the surgery, which, she says, has given her more energy, improved her relationship with her family and boosted her self-esteem.

Malgorzata Brzozowska, the endocrinologist who led the review published last week in the International Journal of Obesity, said the more radical the weight-loss procedure, the greater the impact it seemed to have on bones. ”What’s new about this review is that these procedures may cause changes in hormones, which has a negative impact on bones. However, we only have evidence of that from animal studies. So, more research is needed,” she said.

Bone loss was also likely to occur after surgery because fewer nutrients, such as vitamin D and calcium, were being absorbed, while doctors too often assumed that overweight and obese people had strong bones to begin with. ”We are finding that obesity does in fact have a detrimental effect on bone health,” she said.

Dr Brzozowska said bariatric surgery was beneficial to many patients and extremely effective where other treatments failed. ”But the message to convey is people having any of these procedures should take bone health into consideration.”

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BEFORE surgeons removed a large part of her stomach to help her lose weight, Vanessa Hall asked her doctor what effect the procedure would have on her body by the time she turned 80.
Nanjing Night Net

His answer, she said, was: ”We don’t know what happens.”

And therein lies the dilemma for about 17,000 people the Australian Bureau of Statistics says have the procedure each year – little is known about what effect reducing, removing or bypassing the stomach has on a patient’s long-term health.

Endocrinologists from Sydney’s Garvan Institute for medical research have completed the first comprehensive review of the impact of bariatric surgery on bone density and say even the least invasive of the weight loss procedures may compromise bone health.

It was a potential repercussion never brought up when Mrs Hall, 30, had her gastric sleeve procedure late last year weighing 109 kilograms. She didn’t have a bone scan.

”I do worry am I not getting my recommended daily intake of certain nutrients and I think that’s why they stress the importance of taking a multivitamin after surgery,” she said. ”You do lose a lot of hair in the first three months afterwards, you feel fatigued.”

Now 84kg, Mrs Hall does not regret the surgery, which she says has given her more energy, improved her relationship with her family and boosted her self-esteem. ”At first you are in pain and your body feels so deprived and malnourished, but the experience was worth it.”

Malgorzata Brzozowska, who led the review published last week in the International Journal of Obesity, said the more radical the weight loss procedure, the greater the impact it seemed to have on bones.

”What’s new about this review is that these procedures may cause changes in hormones, which has a negative impact on bones, however we only have evidence of that from animal studies so more research is needed,” she said.

Bone loss was also likely to occur after surgery because fewer nutrients, like vitamin D and calcium, were being absorbed.

Dr Brzozowska said bariatric surgery was beneficial to many patients and extremely effective where other treatments failed, but such procedures should take bone health into consideration. ”People should be having bone screening before and after the procedures,” she said.

This was particularly important for the increasing number of teenagers undergoing the surgery, she said, since their bones were still developing.

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It seems no decent bistro can stand up its menu without charcuterie.FIRST, a pronunciation lesson. Waiters and restaurateurs – let’s leave their customers out of it – have as much trouble pronouncing ”charcuterie” as Richie’s commentary team has with Pakistani cricketers’ names.
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You say ”shah-coo-tree”, with equal emphasis on the syllables, not ”shah-coot-er-ee”.

Now, the growing popularity of these pork and other prepared meat products.

Hell of the North chef Sean Marshall worked in France and fell in love with Gallic tucker. It is, he says, ”very pleasurable” to make charcuterie. He believes it may be becoming more popular in Melbourne restaurants because ”people like to have something nostalgic on the plate”.

It has arrived hand-in-hand with the popularity of earthy national cooking styles such as Greece’s.

Michael Bannerman, who runs PM24’s kitchen for celebrated veteran chef Philippe Mouchel, says charcuterie is ”very popular” with diners. He agrees that its recent growth perhaps owes something to a yearning for more basic dishes. Charcuterie encourages sharing, and is hugely popular at catered events, he says. Even timid eaters try terrine.

Charcuterie is almost exclusively pork food. In France, the verb ”charcuter” means to cut up meat. But by the 16th century it had acquired the special meaning of butchering and selling pork meat. (In French slang, the verb also denotes what your surgeon does to you on the slab.)

In France, charcutiers own and run shops selling pork products. They make their own hams, salamis and snags, and also prepare cold vegetable-only entrees such as leek in vinaigrette sauce.

Now in Melbourne, it seems, no decent bistro can stand up its menu without rillettes, terrines and ham.

PM24 – it’s in the CBD – offers a selection but also includes wild rabbit rillettes among its ”little bites”. Rillettes are traditionally made from pork shreds, fat and seasoning, but recent versions have been concocted using rabbit and duck meat.

The Meat Market at South Wharf has ”slate” charcuterie, which has nothing to do with either the texture or taste of what it tables, and Hell of the North offers a pork terrine with onion ”confiture” and chicken-liver parfait.

I first heard the word ”charcuterie” – and ate what it meant – many decades ago on my first visit to France. It was an era when the Gauls had as high a regard for cholesterol as they did for les Anglais across La Manche. (They are more careful eaters these days.)

Charcuterie was a common entree. You’d help yourself to loads of it. On a thick fruitwood platter silhouetted to resemble a bloated porker, there’d be a thick slice of ”country” terrine, another of chicken-liver mousse, several slices of Bayonne ham, and many more of andouille and saucisson.

My favourite charcuterie speciality is something you can’t get in Australia: the great ”shit snag”, as I call it. It’s andouillette – made from the bowels of pigs. The entrails are scrupulously cleaned then chopped, run into fat casings – empty intestines – and simmered in stock. They’re usually grilled and when you slit open a great andouillette, little curls of pig guts tumble out. A faint whiff of the pigpen rises, and you’re in gastro-heaven.

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