南京夜网,江苏夜网,南京夜生活网 http://www.vnzrva.tw Powered by Szlaining! Sun, 21 Apr 2019 05:46:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.6 V8s left on the grid as F1 takes spotlight http://www.vnzrva.tw/v8s-left-on-the-grid-as-f1-takes-spotlight/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 05:46:48 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/v8s-left-on-the-grid-as-f1-takes-spotlight/ Nanjing Night Net

NEVER has V8 Supercars gone so far for so little. As the undercard to formula one at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix this weekend, Australia's premier racing series got three short races and the cold shoulder.

Unlike the previous two treks to Abu Dhabi in 2010 and last year, when the V8s were the main show at the dazzling Yas Marina circuit, this time they have been pushed into the background, with limited track time, unfriendly scheduling and having had to accept being penned in the secondary pit lane with no access to the F1 area.

Being marginalised by the F1 organisers has been a shock to the V8 Supercars contingent, who are used to VIP treatment on their foreign forays. It's a long way to fly 28 cars and hundreds of tonnes of spare parts in two jumbo jets, plus airlift hundreds of V8 Supercars and team personnel, for three 12-lap, 65-kilometre sprint races.

Aside from the novelty qualifying races at the Sandown 500 in September, these are by far the shortest the V8s contest all year. So short that pit stops for tyres and fuel, along with the strategic element they add, are redundant.

Of course, being on the supporting program of an F1 event means a guest racing category will play second fiddle to the main event, but treatment verging on disdain is another matter altogether.

As well as the derisively short races, on top of severely restricted practice and qualifying sessions on Friday, the teams, officials and most of the travelling media have been penned in the support paddock far from the F1 paddock and main grandstand.

It is a well-equipped secondary pit lane, topped by a decent grandstand, and the facilities for the teams are better than those of most Australian tracks. But their passes are good for only that part of the track - with a dire written warning that being found in an unauthorised area would result in expulsion. So the V8 drivers and team bosses are just like any other spectator watching the F1s from the sidelines.

In a minor concession, on Friday the V8 teams were given three tickets per car for seats in the grandstand above their pits to watch the F1 action from a trackside vantage point.

There is a growing feeling that F1 boss Bernie Ecclestone's Formula One Management has deliberately made life difficult for V8 Supercars with its ambitions for international expansion.

And it's not as if the V8s are jostling for space or track time with other secondary series; it's the only support category on the program.

Visiting Australian media were told that to cover the V8s, they'd need an F1 credential - notification of which arrived close to the one-month deadline for applications. Those who had organised this then found that, technically, their F1 media pass wasn't good for access to the support paddock. Only some fast-talking has avoided being barred.

At the last minute, V8 officials were informed that the series' regular safety car driver, V8 Utes racer Amber Anderson, was not qualified for the task at Abu Dhabi and had to be replaced by an F1-appointed driver.

The weekend's three sprint races - two on Saturday and one on Sunday - have scheduled for late morning/early afternoon, at least a couple of hours before the F1 day/night action begins, resulting in almost no spectators watching the V8 races.

The track's grandstands were almost deserted during Saturday's almost back-to-back races, which undermines V8 Supercars' contention that the value of being here is performing in front of powerful corporate guests. V8 officials can take some comfort, perhaps, from the fact that MotoGP star Casey Stoner has stopped in to watch on his way to his final race before retirement in Valencia, Spain, next weekend. But then, Stoner is a guest of personal sponsor Red Bull and as well as watching the V8 races from the Triple Holden pit he is hanging out with Red Bull Racing's Mark Webber and Sebastian Vettel in the F1 pits. That's star power for you.

■ Mark Webber's Abu Dhabi Grand Prix weekend got off to a shaky start when he was forced to retire his Red Bull with technical trouble in Friday practice.

The Australian completed only 21 laps in the evening session, 13 fewer than his teammate and the quickest man on the Yas marina track, Sebastian Vettel.

Webber was called back to the pits after water was seen leaking from his car as he left the garage for a heavy fuel run.

He later confirmed it was a KERS issue, although different from that suffered in India the previous week.

''[It's] a pain. Obviously it's not great when your mileage is limited, it's nice to have as much as you can in,'' Webber said. ''We're not to the bottom of the fault yet, that's for sure.''

Despite the shortened run, Webber finished the night fourth fastest, behind McLaren's Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
COMMENT
Nanjing Night Net

NEVER has V8 Supercars gone so far for so little. As the undercard to formula one at the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix this weekend, Australia’s premier racing series got three short races and the cold shoulder.

Unlike the previous two treks to Abu Dhabi in 2010 and last year, when the V8s were the main show at the dazzling Yas Marina circuit, this time they have been pushed into the background, with limited track time, unfriendly scheduling and having had to accept being penned in the secondary pit lane with no access to the F1 area.

Being marginalised by the F1 organisers has been a shock to the V8 Supercars contingent, who are used to VIP treatment on their foreign forays. It’s a long way to fly 28 cars and hundreds of tonnes of spare parts in two jumbo jets, plus airlift hundreds of V8 Supercars and team personnel, for three 12-lap, 65-kilometre sprint races.

Aside from the novelty qualifying races at the Sandown 500 in September, these are by far the shortest the V8s contest all year. So short that pit stops for tyres and fuel, along with the strategic element they add, are redundant.

Of course, being on the supporting program of an F1 event means a guest racing category will play second fiddle to the main event, but treatment verging on disdain is another matter altogether.

As well as the derisively short races, on top of severely restricted practice and qualifying sessions on Friday, the teams, officials and most of the travelling media have been penned in the support paddock far from the F1 paddock and main grandstand.

It is a well-equipped secondary pit lane, topped by a decent grandstand, and the facilities for the teams are better than those of most Australian tracks. But their passes are good for only that part of the track – with a dire written warning that being found in an unauthorised area would result in expulsion. So the V8 drivers and team bosses are just like any other spectator watching the F1s from the sidelines.

In a minor concession, on Friday the V8 teams were given three tickets per car for seats in the grandstand above their pits to watch the F1 action from a trackside vantage point.

There is a growing feeling that F1 boss Bernie Ecclestone’s Formula One Management has deliberately made life difficult for V8 Supercars with its ambitions for international expansion.

And it’s not as if the V8s are jostling for space or track time with other secondary series; it’s the only support category on the program.

Visiting Australian media were told that to cover the V8s, they’d need an F1 credential – notification of which arrived close to the one-month deadline for applications. Those who had organised this then found that, technically, their F1 media pass wasn’t good for access to the support paddock. Only some fast-talking has avoided being barred.

At the last minute, V8 officials were informed that the series’ regular safety car driver, V8 Utes racer Amber Anderson, was not qualified for the task at Abu Dhabi and had to be replaced by an F1-appointed driver.

The weekend’s three sprint races – two on Saturday and one on Sunday – have scheduled for late morning/early afternoon, at least a couple of hours before the F1 day/night action begins, resulting in almost no spectators watching the V8 races.

The track’s grandstands were almost deserted during Saturday’s almost back-to-back races, which undermines V8 Supercars’ contention that the value of being here is performing in front of powerful corporate guests. V8 officials can take some comfort, perhaps, from the fact that MotoGP star Casey Stoner has stopped in to watch on his way to his final race before retirement in Valencia, Spain, next weekend. But then, Stoner is a guest of personal sponsor Red Bull and as well as watching the V8 races from the Triple Holden pit he is hanging out with Red Bull Racing’s Mark Webber and Sebastian Vettel in the F1 pits. That’s star power for you.

■ Mark Webber’s Abu Dhabi Grand Prix weekend got off to a shaky start when he was forced to retire his Red Bull with technical trouble in Friday practice.

The Australian completed only 21 laps in the evening session, 13 fewer than his teammate and the quickest man on the Yas marina track, Sebastian Vettel.

Webber was called back to the pits after water was seen leaking from his car as he left the garage for a heavy fuel run.

He later confirmed it was a KERS issue, although different from that suffered in India the previous week.

”[It’s] a pain. Obviously it’s not great when your mileage is limited, it’s nice to have as much as you can in,” Webber said. ”We’re not to the bottom of the fault yet, that’s for sure.”

Despite the shortened run, Webber finished the night fourth fastest, behind McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton and Jenson Button.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

]]>
Lee offers Cummins help http://www.vnzrva.tw/lee-offers-cummins-help/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 05:46:46 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/lee-offers-cummins-help/ Nanjing Night Net

Cummins, who took seven wickets in his Test debut against South Africa last year, is set to miss his second consecutive summer.

Scans revealed on Friday that he had a back stress fracture, sustained during the Sydney Sixers recent Twenty20 Champion's League triumph.

Lee, who endured similar injury battles when he was Cummins' age, said he had the experience to help the 19-year-old fulfil his potential.

''I'm not saying in any way, shape or form that Pat needs to change his action,'' Lee said.

''But there are some things I reckon I could help him with to make it a little bit easier on his back. The one thing you don't want as a fast bowler is hyper-extension and counter-rotation like he has, and as I did when I was at the same age as Pat. I had that same set-up, where there was a lot of twisting and turning in my action, which is where you get your pace from. But, it does come at a cost.''

Cummins vowed that the latest injury would not dampen his desire to bowl fast when he is cleared to play again. He said he would not be scared to extend himself despite the litany of injuries. ''It wasn't great news, unfortunately,'' Cummins said. ''It was not what I was hoping for or expecting. The good thing is I have time on my side. I never second-guess myself.''

Lee, who retired from first-class cricket to focus on Twenty20 leagues, said he would love to share the insights that Dennis Lillee, whose own career was affected by stress fractures, offered him years ago.

''I would love to get down the nets and work on some stuff with him, just like Dennis Lillee did for me when I was younger,'' Lee said. ''I'm sure he can clean his action up. This is a real blow.

''I'm shattered for Pat, because someone like him bowling 155-160 km/h at the Gabba would be exciting to see. It would be great to see him match what the South Africans have.''

While Lee said Peter Siddle and James Pattinson provided pace and aggression, he conceded that South Africa's Dale Steyn gave the tourists an edge.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
BRETT Lee has offered to help the teenage sensation Pat Cummins ”clean up” his action and help prevent the injuries that had frustrated his career.
Nanjing Night Net

Cummins, who took seven wickets in his Test debut against South Africa last year, is set to miss his second consecutive summer.

Scans revealed on Friday that he had a back stress fracture, sustained during the Sydney Sixers recent Twenty20 Champion’s League triumph.

Lee, who endured similar injury battles when he was Cummins’ age, said he had the experience to help the 19-year-old fulfil his potential.

”I’m not saying in any way, shape or form that Pat needs to change his action,” Lee said.

”But there are some things I reckon I could help him with to make it a little bit easier on his back. The one thing you don’t want as a fast bowler is hyper-extension and counter-rotation like he has, and as I did when I was at the same age as Pat. I had that same set-up, where there was a lot of twisting and turning in my action, which is where you get your pace from. But, it does come at a cost.”

Cummins vowed that the latest injury would not dampen his desire to bowl fast when he is cleared to play again. He said he would not be scared to extend himself despite the litany of injuries. ”It wasn’t great news, unfortunately,” Cummins said. ”It was not what I was hoping for or expecting. The good thing is I have time on my side. I never second-guess myself.”

Lee, who retired from first-class cricket to focus on Twenty20 leagues, said he would love to share the insights that Dennis Lillee, whose own career was affected by stress fractures, offered him years ago.

”I would love to get down the nets and work on some stuff with him, just like Dennis Lillee did for me when I was younger,” Lee said. ”I’m sure he can clean his action up. This is a real blow.

”I’m shattered for Pat, because someone like him bowling 155-160 km/h at the Gabba would be exciting to see. It would be great to see him match what the South Africans have.”

While Lee said Peter Siddle and James Pattinson provided pace and aggression, he conceded that South Africa’s Dale Steyn gave the tourists an edge.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

]]>
Doolan knocks on Test door http://www.vnzrva.tw/doolan-knocks-on-test-door/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 05:46:45 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/doolan-knocks-on-test-door/ Nanjing Night Net

With concerns surrounding Test players Shane Watson (calf muscle) and Ricky Ponting (hamstring) and a string of poor scores from Australia's top batsmen, the 26-year-old Tasmanian picked the perfect moment to play the innings of his 35 first-class match career.

The century came on the back of a stellar start to the season that has now yielded him 490 runs at an average of 81. But his effort to post his highest score - and against a world-class South African attack - was the highlight of a tough day that resulted in only one legitimate wicket falling after almost seven hours of toil by both teams.

''I certainly hoped it's talked about,'' said Doolan when asked if the knock might've caught the attention of the Test selectors.

''But there's plenty of quality players in that dressing room. I mean, Phil Hughes has 19 first-class centuries, three Test centuries and two against South Africa. I think he'd be in the firing line as far as next man in. Who knows? Hopefully, it puts my name up there and, hopefully, people are starting to talk.''

Doolan, whose father Bruce faced the first ball for Tasmania when the state joined the Sheffield Shield competition in 1977, said he wouldn't disappoint his country should his greatest wish be fulfilled.

''I feel there's a little bit of work to be done before that chance may arise,'' he said. ''But certainly, [I] feel confident enough to hold my own out there.''

Doolan resumed his innings on 76 and immediately made an impact when he hit paceman Dale Steyn for 10 runs in the first over of the morning.

While on 88 he tried to pull out of a shot against Rory Kleinveldt's bowling but the ball still raced to the boundary after it found the toe of his bat. He notched his fifth first-class century when he cut Kleinveldt sweetly for four.

''Probably coming to terms with the fact you were playing against the world's best team was my biggest battle and overcoming some nerves to a certain extent,'' he replied when asked about the greatest challenge of the knock.

Steyn was rested after only four overs when it became clear the pitch offered the pacemen nothing. Skipper Graeme Smith ultimately left the bulk of the work to his spin bowlers.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
AFTER scoring an unconquered 161 against South Africa at the SCG on Saturday, Australia A batsman Alex Doolan hoped his innings would warrant some discussion when the national selectors met before this week’s opening Test in Brisbane.
Nanjing Night Net

With concerns surrounding Test players Shane Watson (calf muscle) and Ricky Ponting (hamstring) and a string of poor scores from Australia’s top batsmen, the 26-year-old Tasmanian picked the perfect moment to play the innings of his 35 first-class match career.

The century came on the back of a stellar start to the season that has now yielded him 490 runs at an average of 81. But his effort to post his highest score – and against a world-class South African attack – was the highlight of a tough day that resulted in only one legitimate wicket falling after almost seven hours of toil by both teams.

”I certainly hoped it’s talked about,” said Doolan when asked if the knock might’ve caught the attention of the Test selectors.

”But there’s plenty of quality players in that dressing room. I mean, Phil Hughes has 19 first-class centuries, three Test centuries and two against South Africa. I think he’d be in the firing line as far as next man in. Who knows? Hopefully, it puts my name up there and, hopefully, people are starting to talk.”

Doolan, whose father Bruce faced the first ball for Tasmania when the state joined the Sheffield Shield competition in 1977, said he wouldn’t disappoint his country should his greatest wish be fulfilled.

”I feel there’s a little bit of work to be done before that chance may arise,” he said. ”But certainly, [I] feel confident enough to hold my own out there.”

Doolan resumed his innings on 76 and immediately made an impact when he hit paceman Dale Steyn for 10 runs in the first over of the morning.

While on 88 he tried to pull out of a shot against Rory Kleinveldt’s bowling but the ball still raced to the boundary after it found the toe of his bat. He notched his fifth first-class century when he cut Kleinveldt sweetly for four.

”Probably coming to terms with the fact you were playing against the world’s best team was my biggest battle and overcoming some nerves to a certain extent,” he replied when asked about the greatest challenge of the knock.

Steyn was rested after only four overs when it became clear the pitch offered the pacemen nothing. Skipper Graeme Smith ultimately left the bulk of the work to his spin bowlers.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

]]>
Dark artists drop the ball http://www.vnzrva.tw/dark-artists-drop-the-ball/ Sun, 21 Apr 2019 05:46:44 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/dark-artists-drop-the-ball/ Nanjing Night Net

Thus it has long been and - despite the construction of a more respectable veneer during the past two decades - thus it remains.

The lurking danger is that practitioners of football management's dark arts will one day outsmart themselves.

It's not hard to see the two major events of the past week as outcomes of a lingering old culture coming to grief.

If there is sufficient revulsion over a club contriving to avoid winning games and at an administration for throwing obscene sums of football money at a rugby league star whose heart was never in the indigenous code, perhaps a rethink is due.

Perhaps it's time for administrators to think twice before imagining themselves as Edward de Bono or P.T. Barnum. Those two notables are associated, respectively, with the concept of lateral thinking and the notion of a sucker being born every minute.

At the end of an embarrassing week, it's worth pondering what the acquisition of a priority draft pick by Melbourne in 2009 and the recruitment of Israel Folau by GWS in 2010 actually achieved. Both were attempts at tinkering with the natural order and both have ended badly. If they share a common outcome, it is loss of respect.

More distressing for Melbourne is the likelihood of carnage. Evidence is mounting that during the second half of the 2009 season specific actions were taken by important figures at the club designed to ensure the team didn't win so many games as to disqualify itself from a priority draft pick.

The degree of evil in this, it must be said, is debatable. Obviously it is a practice that can't go unaddressed. Yet it's nothing like the corruption of horse racing or cricket or sports in which the use of performance-enhancing drugs influences outcomes. Self-interest was not at play.

In this case, a club stands accused of exploiting a bad rule by under-performing in what were meaningless games. It was acting in what it reasonably regarded - according to the rules - as its long-term interests. Many of its supporters sensed what was happening and approved of it.

Nevertheless, the idea that a substantial coterie could be embraced within such a conspiracy, without high risk of eventual disclosure, was totally amateurish and utterly foolish.

And it was indisputably against the spirit of sport.

But so was the rule relating to priority draft picks as it then stood. It didn't just invite but encouraged what has happened. The AFL's failure to change its rule at the first hint of the possibility it offered is also condemnable.

The Folau ''coup'' was not so much shady as mean-spirited. A high-profile defector from rugby league represented a significant first strike on the major rival in what was now disputed territory. Or, as a well-versed modern spin doctor might put it, an important marketing tool in the code's attempt to sell itself to a new constituency.

So what did Folau (below) deliver?

Well, certainly nothing on the football field. He was the on-field game's equivalent of US singer Meat Loaf: highly paid but incapable of producing the goods when required.

Under normal circumstances, the club recruiter and football manager who delivered such an unproductive outcome, at such a price, would be under siege.

Clearly, though, these weren't normal circumstances. The AFL's move into western Sydney was perhaps the biggest gamble the game had yet taken. Folau's recruitment was about selling the game there. So can it be said to have worked in the short term or is it likely to impact over the longer haul?

In the here-and-now, a count of bums on seats for home games in Folau's one and only season gives not a hint that he was a game-changer. For their nine debut-season games in Sydney, the Giants' average crowd was barely 15,000. Take out the derbies against the locally popular Swans and that figure falls to just above 7000. There was absolutely no sign of a spike in attendances for games in which Folau took part.

As for the future, if there were young hearts and minds so impressionable as to be won by Folau's brief time chasing the Sherrin, you'd wonder whether they are likely to be made of true-believer stuff.

Beyond this is the ethic of the undertaking in the first place.

An athlete has given up two years of his limited life in the sport in which he has a gift. Folau will be 24 years old at the start of the next rugby league season; the years 22 and 23 were lost. Yes, he made his own decision, but he was bought.

This coup was always too smart by half and, in the end, got what it deserved.

Of course, now the likelihood is that the Giants will snare Kurt Tippett and the departure of Folau will be considered timely.

Stand by for the back-room operators to once again be hailed as masterminds.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
WITH a fundamental ethos of doing whatever it takes to trump one’s opponent, it’s hardly surprising the AFL game’s folklore would thrive on stories of slick deals and corner-cutting.
Nanjing Night Net

Thus it has long been and – despite the construction of a more respectable veneer during the past two decades – thus it remains.

The lurking danger is that practitioners of football management’s dark arts will one day outsmart themselves.

It’s not hard to see the two major events of the past week as outcomes of a lingering old culture coming to grief.

If there is sufficient revulsion over a club contriving to avoid winning games and at an administration for throwing obscene sums of football money at a rugby league star whose heart was never in the indigenous code, perhaps a rethink is due.

Perhaps it’s time for administrators to think twice before imagining themselves as Edward de Bono or P.T. Barnum. Those two notables are associated, respectively, with the concept of lateral thinking and the notion of a sucker being born every minute.

At the end of an embarrassing week, it’s worth pondering what the acquisition of a priority draft pick by Melbourne in 2009 and the recruitment of Israel Folau by GWS in 2010 actually achieved. Both were attempts at tinkering with the natural order and both have ended badly. If they share a common outcome, it is loss of respect.

More distressing for Melbourne is the likelihood of carnage. Evidence is mounting that during the second half of the 2009 season specific actions were taken by important figures at the club designed to ensure the team didn’t win so many games as to disqualify itself from a priority draft pick.

The degree of evil in this, it must be said, is debatable. Obviously it is a practice that can’t go unaddressed. Yet it’s nothing like the corruption of horse racing or cricket or sports in which the use of performance-enhancing drugs influences outcomes. Self-interest was not at play.

In this case, a club stands accused of exploiting a bad rule by under-performing in what were meaningless games. It was acting in what it reasonably regarded – according to the rules – as its long-term interests. Many of its supporters sensed what was happening and approved of it.

Nevertheless, the idea that a substantial coterie could be embraced within such a conspiracy, without high risk of eventual disclosure, was totally amateurish and utterly foolish.

And it was indisputably against the spirit of sport.

But so was the rule relating to priority draft picks as it then stood. It didn’t just invite but encouraged what has happened. The AFL’s failure to change its rule at the first hint of the possibility it offered is also condemnable.

The Folau ”coup” was not so much shady as mean-spirited. A high-profile defector from rugby league represented a significant first strike on the major rival in what was now disputed territory. Or, as a well-versed modern spin doctor might put it, an important marketing tool in the code’s attempt to sell itself to a new constituency.

So what did Folau (below) deliver?

Well, certainly nothing on the football field. He was the on-field game’s equivalent of US singer Meat Loaf: highly paid but incapable of producing the goods when required.

Under normal circumstances, the club recruiter and football manager who delivered such an unproductive outcome, at such a price, would be under siege.

Clearly, though, these weren’t normal circumstances. The AFL’s move into western Sydney was perhaps the biggest gamble the game had yet taken. Folau’s recruitment was about selling the game there. So can it be said to have worked in the short term or is it likely to impact over the longer haul?

In the here-and-now, a count of bums on seats for home games in Folau’s one and only season gives not a hint that he was a game-changer. For their nine debut-season games in Sydney, the Giants’ average crowd was barely 15,000. Take out the derbies against the locally popular Swans and that figure falls to just above 7000. There was absolutely no sign of a spike in attendances for games in which Folau took part.

As for the future, if there were young hearts and minds so impressionable as to be won by Folau’s brief time chasing the Sherrin, you’d wonder whether they are likely to be made of true-believer stuff.

Beyond this is the ethic of the undertaking in the first place.

An athlete has given up two years of his limited life in the sport in which he has a gift. Folau will be 24 years old at the start of the next rugby league season; the years 22 and 23 were lost. Yes, he made his own decision, but he was bought.

This coup was always too smart by half and, in the end, got what it deserved.

Of course, now the likelihood is that the Giants will snare Kurt Tippett and the departure of Folau will be considered timely.

Stand by for the back-room operators to once again be hailed as masterminds.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

]]>
Radical Springvale imam returns to preach jihad http://www.vnzrva.tw/radical-springvale-imam-returns-to-preach-jihad/ Fri, 22 Mar 2019 02:06:59 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/2019/03/22/radical-springvale-imam-returns-to-preach-jihad/ Nanjing Night Net

Harun Mehicevic, also known as Abu Talha, returned from Bosnia late last month and is again extolling the virtues of jihad at the Al-Furqan Islamic Information Centre in Springvale South.

The Australian Federal Police raided the centre and Mr Mehicevic's home in September during an operation that focused on 12 properties, most of them in Melbourne's south-east. Mr Mehicevic was in Bosnia at the time.

As a result of the raids, Adnan Karabegovic, 23, was charged with four counts of collecting documents in connection with the preparation of a terrorist act. The maximum penalty for the offence is 15 years' jail.

The raids led to the seizure of items including a computer memory stick containing ''violent extremist materials'', as well as imitation firearms and registered guns.

Speaking from the driveway of a flat in Springvale South, Mr Mehicevic said he had been silent since the raids because he felt nothing could be gained from speaking while the Al-Furqan centre was being criticised.

''With all the hype of raids and everything, you get no benefit of talking,'' he said. ''You wait for everything to settle down.''

Mr Mehicevic said he was angry that he had been described as the leader of a religious cult, but would wait until after the Islamic festival of Eid al-Adha, which was held on the last weekend in October, before deciding whether to discuss the raids in detail. He wrote in an email that the centre had ''decided to keep identical line related to media. Without engagement at all.''

Mr Mehicevic is a controversial figure within the Muslim community. The imam of the nearby Bosnian mosque in Noble Park, Ibrahim Omerdic, said Mehicevic had led a group of ''radical followers'' away from the Noble Park mosque about 10 years ago.

Another community source who also spoke of Mr Mehicevic soon after the raids said he was not well respected in Melbourne's Islamic community.

Mr Mehicevic said reports about his past and a protest outside the Global Atheist Convention in Melbourne had made him wary of the media. He said some aspects of his history had been reported accurately, but he would not elaborate. Fairfax reported after the raids that sources said he had come to Australia from Bosnia as a young adult in the mid-1990s, and that he had a Pakistani-born wife and six children. Mr Mehicevic studied arts at Deakin University and possibly gained a diploma in teaching.

He turned to a conservative form of Islam known as Salafism, became a follower of hardline Melbourne cleric Sheikh Mohammed Omran, and associated with Abdul Nacer Benbrika, who is serving 15-years' jail for planning a terrorist attack in Melbourne in 2005. When Benbrika split from Omran, Mr Mehicevic remained loyal to the senior cleric.

He said any interview to be conducted after Eid al-Adha would need to be conducted on his terms. ''Whatever we say to you is to be recorded and made to fit what we have said.''

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
THE leader of an Islamic group at the centre of anti-terror raids has returned from overseas to resume his hardline preaching in Melbourne.
Nanjing Night Net

Harun Mehicevic, also known as Abu Talha, returned from Bosnia late last month and is again extolling the virtues of jihad at the Al-Furqan Islamic Information Centre in Springvale South.

The Australian Federal Police raided the centre and Mr Mehicevic’s home in September during an operation that focused on 12 properties, most of them in Melbourne’s south-east. Mr Mehicevic was in Bosnia at the time.

As a result of the raids, Adnan Karabegovic, 23, was charged with four counts of collecting documents in connection with the preparation of a terrorist act. The maximum penalty for the offence is 15 years’ jail.

The raids led to the seizure of items including a computer memory stick containing ”violent extremist materials”, as well as imitation firearms and registered guns.

Speaking from the driveway of a flat in Springvale South, Mr Mehicevic said he had been silent since the raids because he felt nothing could be gained from speaking while the Al-Furqan centre was being criticised.

”With all the hype of raids and everything, you get no benefit of talking,” he said. ”You wait for everything to settle down.”

Mr Mehicevic said he was angry that he had been described as the leader of a religious cult, but would wait until after the Islamic festival of Eid al-Adha, which was held on the last weekend in October, before deciding whether to discuss the raids in detail. He wrote in an email that the centre had ”decided to keep identical line related to media. Without engagement at all.”

Mr Mehicevic is a controversial figure within the Muslim community. The imam of the nearby Bosnian mosque in Noble Park, Ibrahim Omerdic, said Mehicevic had led a group of ”radical followers” away from the Noble Park mosque about 10 years ago.

Another community source who also spoke of Mr Mehicevic soon after the raids said he was not well respected in Melbourne’s Islamic community.

Mr Mehicevic said reports about his past and a protest outside the Global Atheist Convention in Melbourne had made him wary of the media. He said some aspects of his history had been reported accurately, but he would not elaborate. Fairfax reported after the raids that sources said he had come to Australia from Bosnia as a young adult in the mid-1990s, and that he had a Pakistani-born wife and six children. Mr Mehicevic studied arts at Deakin University and possibly gained a diploma in teaching.

He turned to a conservative form of Islam known as Salafism, became a follower of hardline Melbourne cleric Sheikh Mohammed Omran, and associated with Abdul Nacer Benbrika, who is serving 15-years’ jail for planning a terrorist attack in Melbourne in 2005. When Benbrika split from Omran, Mr Mehicevic remained loyal to the senior cleric.

He said any interview to be conducted after Eid al-Adha would need to be conducted on his terms. ”Whatever we say to you is to be recorded and made to fit what we have said.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

]]>
Snapper’s back and they’re reeling them in http://www.vnzrva.tw/snappers-back-and-theyre-reeling-them-in/ Fri, 22 Mar 2019 02:06:58 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/2019/03/22/snappers-back-and-theyre-reeling-them-in/ Nanjing Night Net

WITH his fishing rod bending so sharply it resembles a giant fishing hook, Mario Ceniccola grips the handle tightly with one hand, winds up the reel with his other hand and gradually lowers the tip of the rod to the water.

Ten months ago the 62-year-old survived a heart attack; and this morning that organ is getting a workout as the enthusiastic fisherman tries to land his first fish for the day. Clearly it is a big one, undoubtedly a snapper - and certainly the other anglers on the boat wish it was on their line.

With a contest in its early stages and the fish still deep in Port Phillip Bay's calm waters, Mr Ceniccola urges it to co-operate. ''Slowly come to papa, slowly come to papa,'' he says, in a soothing but straining voice.

Mr Ceniccola knows it is best to be patient. After about five minutes his patience is rewarded: the snapper has been brought to within a few centimetres of the surface, its pink and silver colours glistening in the early morning light.

The boat's skipper, Matt Cini, likes what he sees. ''This is a big fish, this is a very big fish, Mario,'' he says, net in hand. He dips it in the water, collects the snapper and lifts it on board. Mr Cini, owner of Reel Time Fishing Charters, estimates it weighs about 6.5 or 7 kilograms. ''Look how fat he is, he's like a footy,'' he says excitedly.

''That's a barrel, mate, that's a photo fish - you don't catch them every day,'' he says.

Mr Cini is right, on both counts. The snapper weighs in at 6.5 kilograms, a hefty size a keen angler would not catch in Port Phillip Bay every day, though nowadays it seems anglers chasing snapper have a better chance than just a few years ago.

Fishermen say the bay's snapper fishery is as healthy as they have ever seen. The unofficial starting date for the snapper season is October 1, but November, says Mr Cini, is the best month. It is also the month for fishing competitions, including the Tea Tree Snapper Fishing competition, held over the past two days.

Mr Cini, who runs charters from Carrum, says Mr Ceniccola's fish is the biggest caught by one of his customers so far this season. And for Mr Ceniccola it is a personal best. ''I have never caught one that big either, three kilos is my biggest,'' he says, after a few back slaps and the odd high-five.

It is a tick past 7am and the golden, pink and mauve colours that stretched over the bay at sunrise have been replaced by bright but gentle sunshine. A few kilometres away residents of Melbourne's suburbs are into their morning routine: having breakfast, a shower, getting dressed, or travelling to work.

But on Port Phillip Bay it is another world. There are enough people on fishing boats to populate an entire suburb. Mr Cini estimates that more than 300 boats launched at Carrum this morning, and the procession of vehicles towing trailers to the ramps at 4.50am vindicate his estimate.

The snapper fishery has improved markedly over the past two decades, Mr Cini says. In the mid-1990s, when he was learning how to fish with his uncle, snapper fishing trips were not very productive. ''I used to work all weekend to catch two fish, to catch two snapper. And the fishery has just become so healthy now,'' he says.

He attributes the improvement to two main things: the cessation of scallop dredging in 1997 and efforts to protect the Yarra and bay from pollution. ''The [snapper] schools that we find now can be up to a couple of hundred metres long and 10 or 20 metres wide. And anywhere from two metres to six metres high, of just solid fish,'' he says.

Veteran bay angler Ian Jones, from Beaumaris, says the bay's snapper fishery is in better health today than he has seen. ''I think that the snapper fishery now is world class, it will continue to be world class and it's absolutely outstanding compared with what it used to be. It's much easier to catch fish - I don't think it's all [because of] technology - I think it's a lot to do with the way the fisheries are managed,'' he says.

Back on the boat, Mr Ceniccola has hooked another good fish. ''Holy Moses, Abraham, give me a hand,'' he says, reeling steadily. It sounds like a plea for help, but it's clear he's enjoying himself.

''This leaves sex for dead,'' he adds.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
That’s a big ‘un: Mario Ceniccola (left) and Matt Cini relish the bay’s piscine pleasures. Anglers think the fishery is healthier than ever.
Nanjing Night Net

WITH his fishing rod bending so sharply it resembles a giant fishing hook, Mario Ceniccola grips the handle tightly with one hand, winds up the reel with his other hand and gradually lowers the tip of the rod to the water.

Ten months ago the 62-year-old survived a heart attack; and this morning that organ is getting a workout as the enthusiastic fisherman tries to land his first fish for the day. Clearly it is a big one, undoubtedly a snapper – and certainly the other anglers on the boat wish it was on their line.

With a contest in its early stages and the fish still deep in Port Phillip Bay’s calm waters, Mr Ceniccola urges it to co-operate. ”Slowly come to papa, slowly come to papa,” he says, in a soothing but straining voice.

Mr Ceniccola knows it is best to be patient. After about five minutes his patience is rewarded: the snapper has been brought to within a few centimetres of the surface, its pink and silver colours glistening in the early morning light.

The boat’s skipper, Matt Cini, likes what he sees. ”This is a big fish, this is a very big fish, Mario,” he says, net in hand. He dips it in the water, collects the snapper and lifts it on board. Mr Cini, owner of Reel Time Fishing Charters, estimates it weighs about 6.5 or 7 kilograms. ”Look how fat he is, he’s like a footy,” he says excitedly.

”That’s a barrel, mate, that’s a photo fish – you don’t catch them every day,” he says.

Mr Cini is right, on both counts. The snapper weighs in at 6.5 kilograms, a hefty size a keen angler would not catch in Port Phillip Bay every day, though nowadays it seems anglers chasing snapper have a better chance than just a few years ago.

Fishermen say the bay’s snapper fishery is as healthy as they have ever seen. The unofficial starting date for the snapper season is October 1, but November, says Mr Cini, is the best month. It is also the month for fishing competitions, including the Tea Tree Snapper Fishing competition, held over the past two days.

Mr Cini, who runs charters from Carrum, says Mr Ceniccola’s fish is the biggest caught by one of his customers so far this season. And for Mr Ceniccola it is a personal best. ”I have never caught one that big either, three kilos is my biggest,” he says, after a few back slaps and the odd high-five.

It is a tick past 7am and the golden, pink and mauve colours that stretched over the bay at sunrise have been replaced by bright but gentle sunshine. A few kilometres away residents of Melbourne’s suburbs are into their morning routine: having breakfast, a shower, getting dressed, or travelling to work.

But on Port Phillip Bay it is another world. There are enough people on fishing boats to populate an entire suburb. Mr Cini estimates that more than 300 boats launched at Carrum this morning, and the procession of vehicles towing trailers to the ramps at 4.50am vindicate his estimate.

The snapper fishery has improved markedly over the past two decades, Mr Cini says. In the mid-1990s, when he was learning how to fish with his uncle, snapper fishing trips were not very productive. ”I used to work all weekend to catch two fish, to catch two snapper. And the fishery has just become so healthy now,” he says.

He attributes the improvement to two main things: the cessation of scallop dredging in 1997 and efforts to protect the Yarra and bay from pollution. ”The [snapper] schools that we find now can be up to a couple of hundred metres long and 10 or 20 metres wide. And anywhere from two metres to six metres high, of just solid fish,” he says.

Veteran bay angler Ian Jones, from Beaumaris, says the bay’s snapper fishery is in better health today than he has seen. ”I think that the snapper fishery now is world class, it will continue to be world class and it’s absolutely outstanding compared with what it used to be. It’s much easier to catch fish – I don’t think it’s all [because of] technology – I think it’s a lot to do with the way the fisheries are managed,” he says.

Back on the boat, Mr Ceniccola has hooked another good fish. ”Holy Moses, Abraham, give me a hand,” he says, reeling steadily. It sounds like a plea for help, but it’s clear he’s enjoying himself.

”This leaves sex for dead,” he adds.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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I held on tight and hoped for the best, says passenger http://www.vnzrva.tw/i-held-on-tight-and-hoped-for-the-best-says-passenger/ Fri, 22 Mar 2019 02:06:57 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/2019/03/22/i-held-on-tight-and-hoped-for-the-best-says-passenger/ Nanjing Night Net

Bill Graham was on the second carriage of a Cranbourne-bound train on Saturday morning when the front carriage took the impact of the smash.

''I heard this really loud bang and I could see this big truck crossing the road and the front carriage just got turned around about 90 degrees,'' he said. ''I couldn't see the driver because of all the dust and smoke, I only saw the back end of the truck. It had almost made it across the crossing but I can't remember whether the boom gates were down or not.

''The train carriages were rattling all over the place and the train tracks were all bent up. I held on to the rail above my seat pretty tightly until it was all over and just hoped for the best.''

The 64-year-old retiree from Glen Waverley said it took about a minute for the train to come to a complete stop. He estimated about 20 passengers were aboard at the time of the impact, which came shortly after the train left Dandenong station on its way to Lynbrook station.

''After the bang I didn't hear any people screaming - there was just too much noise from the train itself,'' Mr Graham said. ''It just kept going and then it gradually slowed down and I was able to get off through the third carriage with two other guys who were down the back. We managed to get off out the side door. I saw a couple of people in my carriage who had some cuts and grazes but I was lucky, I didn't have to go to hospital.''

Mr Graham said the incident had shaken him up, particularly when he heard a fellow passenger had died. ''It was a terrible shock,'' he said. ''It just makes you value your life.''

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
A SURVIVOR of a rail crash that killed one man and injured up to 12 others at a level crossing in Melbourne’s south-east has described his terror when his train collided with a semi-trailer.
Nanjing Night Net

Bill Graham was on the second carriage of a Cranbourne-bound train on Saturday morning when the front carriage took the impact of the smash.

”I heard this really loud bang and I could see this big truck crossing the road and the front carriage just got turned around about 90 degrees,” he said. ”I couldn’t see the driver because of all the dust and smoke, I only saw the back end of the truck. It had almost made it across the crossing but I can’t remember whether the boom gates were down or not.

”The train carriages were rattling all over the place and the train tracks were all bent up. I held on to the rail above my seat pretty tightly until it was all over and just hoped for the best.”

The 64-year-old retiree from Glen Waverley said it took about a minute for the train to come to a complete stop. He estimated about 20 passengers were aboard at the time of the impact, which came shortly after the train left Dandenong station on its way to Lynbrook station.

”After the bang I didn’t hear any people screaming – there was just too much noise from the train itself,” Mr Graham said. ”It just kept going and then it gradually slowed down and I was able to get off through the third carriage with two other guys who were down the back. We managed to get off out the side door. I saw a couple of people in my carriage who had some cuts and grazes but I was lucky, I didn’t have to go to hospital.”

Mr Graham said the incident had shaken him up, particularly when he heard a fellow passenger had died. ”It was a terrible shock,” he said. ”It just makes you value your life.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

]]>
Zoom doom! Bestseller Mazda fails driving test http://www.vnzrva.tw/zoom-doom-bestseller-mazda-fails-driving-test/ Fri, 22 Mar 2019 02:06:55 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/2019/03/22/zoom-doom-bestseller-mazda-fails-driving-test/ Nanjing Night Net

It's the latest blow for novice drivers who are already forced to apply for a special exemption to drive the many modern low-power, fuel-efficient, turbocharged cars.

New drivers must tackle some of the strictest rules in the country before they are allowed on the road, as VicRoads guidelines surrounding speedometers have stopped people from using the best-selling Mazda3 to try for their licence.

Mazda owner Owen Shemansky was told this year that his wife could not use their car to take her driving test as its speedometer was not visible from the passenger seat.

''We bought the Mazda before she was even going for her learner's licence. We were thinking she would take the car and use it when the time comes,'' Mr Shemansky said. ''They knocked us back on the day [of the test] … they turned us away on the spot.''

Mr Shemansky said he was frustrated. ''Buying a brand-new car in Victoria, you'd think a consumer could have a reasonable expectation that it could be used in Victoria for a driver's test.''

Shrouds around the Mazda3 dashboard limit the view of its speedometer from the passenger seat. A VicRoads spokeswoman said some cars were not suitable for driving exams because the entire speedometer ''must be easily visible to the testing officer from the front and rear passenger seat''. She said a supplementary speedo could be fitted to test cars, but that GPS speed readouts were not allowed and would not be considered in the future ''unless they can be proven to be as accurate as speedometers''.

Provisionary drivers already cannot take the wheel of turbocharged cars such as Volkswagen's base-model 1.2-litre Golf without applying for special exemption, but can drive Toyota's 3.5-litre Aurion with double the power.

David Stannus, owner of Australian Design Rules consultancy firm Protech Developments, said VicRoads was out of touch with technology and that GPS units provided a more accurate measurement of speed. He said most dashboard speedometers had a 4 per cent error margin.''GPS will give you an accuracy of 0.5 per cent,'' he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
Guidelines surrounding speedometers have stopped people from using the best-selling car to try for their licence.AUSTRALIA’S best-selling car cannot be used in the VicRoads licence test – despite being approved for use in other states.
Nanjing Night Net

It’s the latest blow for novice drivers who are already forced to apply for a special exemption to drive the many modern low-power, fuel-efficient, turbocharged cars.

New drivers must tackle some of the strictest rules in the country before they are allowed on the road, as VicRoads guidelines surrounding speedometers have stopped people from using the best-selling Mazda3 to try for their licence.

Mazda owner Owen Shemansky was told this year that his wife could not use their car to take her driving test as its speedometer was not visible from the passenger seat.

”We bought the Mazda before she was even going for her learner’s licence. We were thinking she would take the car and use it when the time comes,” Mr Shemansky said. ”They knocked us back on the day [of the test] … they turned us away on the spot.”

Mr Shemansky said he was frustrated. ”Buying a brand-new car in Victoria, you’d think a consumer could have a reasonable expectation that it could be used in Victoria for a driver’s test.”

Shrouds around the Mazda3 dashboard limit the view of its speedometer from the passenger seat. A VicRoads spokeswoman said some cars were not suitable for driving exams because the entire speedometer ”must be easily visible to the testing officer from the front and rear passenger seat”. She said a supplementary speedo could be fitted to test cars, but that GPS speed readouts were not allowed and would not be considered in the future ”unless they can be proven to be as accurate as speedometers”.

Provisionary drivers already cannot take the wheel of turbocharged cars such as Volkswagen’s base-model 1.2-litre Golf without applying for special exemption, but can drive Toyota’s 3.5-litre Aurion with double the power.

David Stannus, owner of Australian Design Rules consultancy firm Protech Developments, said VicRoads was out of touch with technology and that GPS units provided a more accurate measurement of speed. He said most dashboard speedometers had a 4 per cent error margin.”GPS will give you an accuracy of 0.5 per cent,” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

]]>
Kill yourself, club owner tells schoolgirls http://www.vnzrva.tw/kill-yourself-club-owner-tells-schoolgirls/ Thu, 21 Feb 2019 06:40:08 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/2019/02/21/kill-yourself-club-owner-tells-schoolgirls/ Nanjing Night Net

The young women had attended the Pens Down party at CBD nightclub Roxanne Parlour, where students celebrated the end of year 12 before VCE exams began last week.

Pens Down promoter Christian Serrao posted 262 photographs on the event's Facebook page, which included about 30 images of schoolgirls posing provocatively and kissing each other.

Some of the girls were embarrassed by the photographs, while others were under 18 and not legally permitted to enter licensed premises.

Other images taken on a river cruise promoted by Mr Serrao showed a young man in school uniform vomiting from the side of a boat.

When several students asked Mr Serrao to delete the images, he posted the following response: ''I just love how these year 12s are happy to get their tits out for photos, then send threatening messages if they're not deleted off our Facebook page. Kill Yourself.''

Yesterday, Mr Serrao defended the post and said the expression ''kill yourself'' was an internet meme that was not meant to be taken literally.

''It's a comedic thing that's all over the internet,'' Mr Serrao said. ''Some people won't understand it but you can Google it and see for yourself.''

He said all requests to delete the images had been complied with, after some of the young women expressed concerns that their parents would find them or they were unhappy with their appearance.

The practice of using provocative images of young women to promote functions was widespread across Melbourne's nightclub industry, Mr Serrao said.

''There's always girls kissing and doing sexy little things,'' he said. ''You get 1 per cent who wake up the next day and aren't happy and ask us to take them down.''

He said Roxanne Parlour required proof of age and scanned identification before entry but conceded that some under-aged patrons ''fall through the cracks''.

A spokesman for the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation confirmed it was investigating the Pens Down event held on October 24.

Liberty Victoria chairman Spencer Zifcak said the abuse of Facebook sites reinforced the need for privacy legislation.

''This would seem to be a situation where everyone is behaving badly,'' Mr Zifcak said. ''These young women have been foolish, while the promoter's response is a disgrace. But these students are vulnerable and if they, or their parents, ask for the images to be removed, they should be taken down immediately.''

Last year, The Sunday Age revealed that parents from several prominent private schools had considered suing St Kilda's Prince of Wales hotel, after images of their daughters, some just 16, had been used to promote the venue. Promoter and music industry figure Frank Cotela was sacked by the owners of Prince of Wales two weeks after the legal threats were made. At the time, St Michael's Grammar principal Simon Gipson said he was deeply concerned by the exploitation of the students on social media sites.

''We deplore the manner in which young women are commodified and sexualised in this way,'' he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
VICTORIA’S liquor licensing authority is investigating a nightclub promoter who told several schoolgirls via social media to ”kill yourself” after they asked to have provocative images removed from the venue’s Facebook page.
Nanjing Night Net

The young women had attended the Pens Down party at CBD nightclub Roxanne Parlour, where students celebrated the end of year 12 before VCE exams began last week.

Pens Down promoter Christian Serrao posted 262 photographs on the event’s Facebook page, which included about 30 images of schoolgirls posing provocatively and kissing each other.

Some of the girls were embarrassed by the photographs, while others were under 18 and not legally permitted to enter licensed premises.

Other images taken on a river cruise promoted by Mr Serrao showed a young man in school uniform vomiting from the side of a boat.

When several students asked Mr Serrao to delete the images, he posted the following response: ”I just love how these year 12s are happy to get their tits out for photos, then send threatening messages if they’re not deleted off our Facebook page. Kill Yourself.”

Yesterday, Mr Serrao defended the post and said the expression ”kill yourself” was an internet meme that was not meant to be taken literally.

”It’s a comedic thing that’s all over the internet,” Mr Serrao said. ”Some people won’t understand it but you can Google it and see for yourself.”

He said all requests to delete the images had been complied with, after some of the young women expressed concerns that their parents would find them or they were unhappy with their appearance.

The practice of using provocative images of young women to promote functions was widespread across Melbourne’s nightclub industry, Mr Serrao said.

”There’s always girls kissing and doing sexy little things,” he said. ”You get 1 per cent who wake up the next day and aren’t happy and ask us to take them down.”

He said Roxanne Parlour required proof of age and scanned identification before entry but conceded that some under-aged patrons ”fall through the cracks”.

A spokesman for the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation confirmed it was investigating the Pens Down event held on October 24.

Liberty Victoria chairman Spencer Zifcak said the abuse of Facebook sites reinforced the need for privacy legislation.

”This would seem to be a situation where everyone is behaving badly,” Mr Zifcak said. ”These young women have been foolish, while the promoter’s response is a disgrace. But these students are vulnerable and if they, or their parents, ask for the images to be removed, they should be taken down immediately.”

Last year, The Sunday Age revealed that parents from several prominent private schools had considered suing St Kilda’s Prince of Wales hotel, after images of their daughters, some just 16, had been used to promote the venue. Promoter and music industry figure Frank Cotela was sacked by the owners of Prince of Wales two weeks after the legal threats were made. At the time, St Michael’s Grammar principal Simon Gipson said he was deeply concerned by the exploitation of the students on social media sites.

”We deplore the manner in which young women are commodified and sexualised in this way,” he said.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

]]>
Backlog sparks ambulance alert http://www.vnzrva.tw/backlog-sparks-ambulance-alert/ Thu, 21 Feb 2019 06:40:06 +0000 http://www.vnzrva.tw/2019/02/21/backlog-sparks-ambulance-alert/ Nanjing Night Net

A spokesman for Ambulance Victoria confirmed the service called a ''code-orange'' alert for about an hour from 11.30pm to help manage a high caseload.

The code is the second-highest level of alert in the state's Health Emergency Response Plan and puts doctors on notice that they can be called in to help. It was designed to manage healthcare for disasters such as bushfires and mass-casualty accidents.

A source said the code-orange call came as about 40 patients were waiting for an ambulance, including a code-one emergency case that had been waiting for 45 minutes.

Code-one cases are critical, life-threatening situations that the ambulance service aims to treat within 15 minutes.

Ambulance Employees Association state secretary Steve McGhie said the code-orange call showed the service could not cope with normal demand.

''This is just day-to-day business, it shows they can't cope because they haven't got enough resources,'' he said.

''You've got up to 42 cases waiting at 11.30 at night, they resort to code orange to stop ambulance crews having meal breaks and force them to work after the end of their shifts when they've already done 12 or 14 hours. It's a misuse of code orange.''

The ambulance service also called a code-orange alert on July 18, between midnight and 8.30pm, due to high levels of winter illness.

Ambulance Victoria spokesman Danny McGennisken said the calls were ''part of normal business processes and the emergency response plan was developed to help us manage these circumstances.

''It allows us to manage caseload as required and call in additional resources if they are needed.''

Opposition parliamentary secretary for health Wade Noonan said the ambulance service was in crisis.

''Response times are getting longer, ambulances are being parked up for hours outside emergency departments and now the service is having to implement emergency response plans to cope with normal business operations,'' he said.

''There is nothing routine about this. The emergency response plan is reserved for incidents involving mass casualties, such as natural disasters.''

■KHagan@theage南京夜网.au

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.Read More →]]>
A BACKLOG of cases prompted Victoria’s ambulance service to activate an emergency response plan normally reserved for mass-casualty accidents on Monday night, for the second time in three months.
Nanjing Night Net

A spokesman for Ambulance Victoria confirmed the service called a ”code-orange” alert for about an hour from 11.30pm to help manage a high caseload.

The code is the second-highest level of alert in the state’s Health Emergency Response Plan and puts doctors on notice that they can be called in to help. It was designed to manage healthcare for disasters such as bushfires and mass-casualty accidents.

A source said the code-orange call came as about 40 patients were waiting for an ambulance, including a code-one emergency case that had been waiting for 45 minutes.

Code-one cases are critical, life-threatening situations that the ambulance service aims to treat within 15 minutes.

Ambulance Employees Association state secretary Steve McGhie said the code-orange call showed the service could not cope with normal demand.

”This is just day-to-day business, it shows they can’t cope because they haven’t got enough resources,” he said.

”You’ve got up to 42 cases waiting at 11.30 at night, they resort to code orange to stop ambulance crews having meal breaks and force them to work after the end of their shifts when they’ve already done 12 or 14 hours. It’s a misuse of code orange.”

The ambulance service also called a code-orange alert on July 18, between midnight and 8.30pm, due to high levels of winter illness.

Ambulance Victoria spokesman Danny McGennisken said the calls were ”part of normal business processes and the emergency response plan was developed to help us manage these circumstances.

”It allows us to manage caseload as required and call in additional resources if they are needed.”

Opposition parliamentary secretary for health Wade Noonan said the ambulance service was in crisis.

”Response times are getting longer, ambulances are being parked up for hours outside emergency departments and now the service is having to implement emergency response plans to cope with normal business operations,” he said.

”There is nothing routine about this. The emergency response plan is reserved for incidents involving mass casualties, such as natural disasters.”

■KHagan@theage南京夜网.au

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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